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Flu Vaccine Information 
Who should get the flu shot?
Everyone 6 months of age and older should get vaccinated against the flu as soon as the 2014-2015 season vaccine is available. It is especially important for certain people to get vaccinated.
These include:
● People who are at high risk of developing serious complications like
  pneumonia if they get sick with the flu  This includes:
    ~ People who have certain medical conditions including asthma,
       diabetes, and chronic lung disease.
    ~ Pregnant women.
    ~ People 65 years and older.
● People who live with or care for others who are high risk of developing
  serious complications
    ~ This includes household contacts and caregivers of people with
       certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and
       chronic lung disease.
● Vaccination is important for health care workers, and other people
   who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu
   to high risk people.
● Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness,
   but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should
   be vaccinated instead.
The vaccine is NOT recommended for the following people:
● Children younger than 6 months
● People who have had Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS)
   within 6 weeks of getting a flu vaccine
● People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs
  or who are allergic to any of the nasal spray vaccine components. 
What strains does the vaccine protect against this year?

All of the 2014-2015 influenza vaccine is made to protect against the following three viruses:

  • an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • an A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus.

Some of the 2014-2015 flu vaccine also protects against an additional B virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus).

Additional Information about the flu vaccine (links):
2014-15 CDC Influenza Information Page
2014-15 Inactivated Vaccine Information Statement  CDC
2014-15 Live, Intranasal Spray Vaccine Statement  CDC
What you should know for the 2014-15 Influenza Season  CDC
Key Facts about Seasonal Flu Vaccine  CDC
Vaccine Effectiveness  CDC
Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine  CDC
Quadravialent Influenza Vaccine   CDC
 (the trivalent vaccine is still the most commonly available)
Flu Vaccines Approved for 2014-15   CDC
 
What flu viruses does this season’s vaccine protect against?
Flu vaccines are designed to protect against flu viruses that experts predict will be the most common during the upcoming season. Three kinds of flu viruses commonly circulate among people today: Influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and influenza B viruses. Each year, one or two flu viruses of each kind are used to produce the seasonal influenza vaccine.

All of the 2014-2015 influenza vaccine is made to protect against the following three viruses:
• an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
• an A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2)-like virus
• a B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus.

Some of the 2014-2015 flu vaccine also protects against an additional B virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus).

Vaccines that give protection against three viruses are called trivalent vaccines. Vaccines that give protection against four viruses are called quadrivalent vaccines.
 
 
Flu Shot
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