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Flu Vaccine Information 
Who should get the flu shot?
Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year by the end of October, if possible. However, getting vaccinated later is OK. Vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some children who have received flu vaccine previously and children who have only received one dose in their lifetime, may need two doses of flu vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

It is especially important for certain people to get vaccinated.
These include:
● People who are at high risk of developing serious complications like
  pneumonia if they get sick with the flu  This includes:
    ~ People who have certain medical conditions including asthma,
       diabetes, and chronic lung disease.
    ~ Pregnant women.
    ~ People 65 years and older.
● People who live with or care for others who are high risk of developing
  serious complications
    ~ This includes household contacts and caregivers of people with
       certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and
       chronic lung disease.
● Vaccination is important for health care workers, and other people
   who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu
   to high risk people.
● Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness,
   but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should
   be vaccinated instead.
The vaccine is NOT recommended for the following people:
● Children younger than 6 months
● People who have had Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS)
   within 6 weeks of getting a flu vaccine
The recommendations for people with egg allergies have been updated for this season. People who have experienced only hives after exposure to egg can get any licensed flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health. People who have symptoms other than hives after exposure to eggs, such as angioedema, respiratory distress, lightheadedness, or recurrent emesis; or who have needed epinephrine or another emergency medical intervention, also can get any licensed flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health, but the vaccine should be given in a medical setting and be supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic conditions. (Settings include hospitals, clinics, health departments, and physician offices). People with egg allergies no longer have to wait 30 minutes after receiving their vaccine.
What strains does the vaccine protect against this year?

Flu vaccines are designed to protect against flu viruses that experts predict will be the most common during the upcoming season. Three kinds of flu viruses commonly circulate among people today: Influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and influenza B viruses. Each year, one or two flu viruses of each kind are used to produce the seasonal influenza vaccine.

Vaccines that give protection against three viruses are called trivalent vaccines. Vaccines that give protection against four viruses are called quadrivalent vaccines.

2016–17 U.S. trivalent influenza vaccines will contain:
 A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)–like virus,
 A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)–like virus and
 B/Brisbane/60/2008–like virus (Victoria lineage)

Quadrivalent vaccines will include an additional vaccine virus strain, a B/Phuket/3073/2013–like virus (Yamagata lineage).

What's new for the 2016-17 Influena Season?
• Only injectable flu shots are recommended for use this season.
• Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses.
• There will be some new vaccines on the market this season.
• The recommendations for vaccination of people with egg allergies have changed.
 
Additional Information about the flu vaccine (links):
2016-17 CDC Influenza Main Information Page
 Frequently Asked Questions About the 2016-17 Influenza Season  CDC
Key Facts about Seasonal Flu Vaccine  CDC
Vaccine Effectiveness  CDC
Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine  CDC
Quadravialent Influenza Vaccine   CDC
 (the trivalent vaccine is still the most commonly available)
 
 
 
Flu Shot
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